Zero & focus at different ranges

Discussion in 'Hunter (HFT) & Field Target (FT)' started by CameronWilson, Mar 14, 2010.

  1. CameronWilson

    CameronWilson Member

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    I assumed that if you were to zero a scope at 35yds, you would also want to have the focus pin-sharp at that range also?

    But I've just read another thread where it sounds as though it might be a good idea to zero & focus the scope at different ranges?

    Cheers,

    Cam.
     
  2. NarkyMark

    NarkyMark New Member

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    Hi Cam,
    It is always a good idea to have your Parallax set to your zero as you will also have zero Parallax error, but if you have a 1/2 decent scope with next to no Parallax error when used in the sub 12ft/lb ranges, then you can have them set at different ranges with next to no issues....
    I personally like to have mine set within 5 to 10 yards of each other.....
    HTH
    Mark
     
  3. Weevie

    Weevie Banned

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    As far as HFT goes, the most common zero seems to be around 35 yards.

    If you shot a good UKAHFT spec course with a parallax setting of 35 yards you'd have a hell of a time on the close up targets.

    For HFT where you can't range find with the scope's parallax, many people set their parallax such that they can tell the difference between the blur at 40 yards and the blur at 45 yards, this helps with range finding the longer shots. This tend to be between 23-27 yards (although as different scopes have different depths of field at different mags that can vary).

    For FT, well you can change your parallax so...

    Obviously whilst zeroing you want your parallax setting to be the same as your zero range to reduce parallax error but again as far as HFT goes, once zeroing is done you'd probably don't want your parallax setting to be the same as your zero.
     
  4. CameronWilson

    CameronWilson Member

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    Mmmm... interesting. Thanks for the advice guys!
     
  5. CameronWilson

    CameronWilson Member

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    Also...

    When I bought the Steyr secondhand, it was basically set up as an FT rig – but I shoot HFT exclusively (at the moment).

    The rifle came with a Steyr weaver bridge & matching Signature Zee mounts, and a Deben 10-50x 56mm scope. I've also got a Hawke Sidewinder 30 6-24x 56mm, a pair of BKL medium mounts and I've ordered a MTC Viper 10x 44mm scope to see what it's like – so I have a number of different combinations to choose from.

    I've heard a few people saying that ideally in FT you want to get the scope as high as possible (weaver bridge), but in HFT you want to get the scope as low as possible. Is this true? Is it really the end of the world if I continue to use the weaver bridge, and what disadvantage would I be at?

    The BKL medium mounts seem quite high (higher than the Hawke high mounts that came with the scope).

    Which would be your ideal combo out of the choice that I have? Viper on BKL?

    Cheers,

    Cam.
     
  6. RobF

    RobF Administrator Staff Member

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    The scope height thing for HFT matters because the bigger the distance of the scope from barrel to scope centre, the more distance the pellet has to overcome before it hits it's zenith (top of trajectory) in relation to the scope... which means you have more drop on closer shots, which makes them more critical to rangefind for HFT, especially with reducers.

    For FT, beyond the fact that a head up is a more comfortable position, the opposite is true... the high mounts allow you to see down the fall of the shot more past the zenith and reduces the amount of clicks needed. That said, I have a couple of rigs with varying scope hieghts and it perhaps takes 1/2 moa off every 5 yards.
     
  7. NarkyMark

    NarkyMark New Member

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    In relation to HFT The lower the mounts the less hold over you will have on the closer range reducers, but you will have slightly more hold over on the longer range 35-45mm Kills and the opposite is true of higher mounts, I personally try and set my scope height and zero to give me no more than 1 mildot hold over @ 45yrds, but I know of some top shooters that prefer less hold over at range and go for slightly higher mounts to achieve this....

    As far as your scope choice, I myself would not use anything above a 44mm Objective for HFT simply because I would not be able to get the scope height low enough for my liking, but one mans meat is another mans poison, so to speak....

    There are ground rules that apply to all sports, because they are tried and trusted methods, but at the end of the day there is no golden rule and it is what suits you best, and anyway rules are there to be broken!...

    ...Except the UKAHFT one's that is :D
     
  8. CameronWilson

    CameronWilson Member

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    Thanks again for your advice, guys!

    Cam.
     

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