Use of slings in FT

Discussion in 'Hunter (HFT) & Field Target (FT)' started by CoolId, Nov 14, 2008.

  1. CoolId

    CoolId New Member

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    I was reading the thread this morning on single point slings in FT on AGF. As I understand the rules, once you clip it to your jacket it has to stay clipped, so that pretty well rules it out as a practical aid

    I have however noticed in recent events a number of people using two point slings - ostensibly fitted to carry the gun - but actively wrapping them round their arm to provide support in particular shots

    Do people feel that this is within the spirit of the sport? I can't see where it is outside the letter of the law

    Regards

    Dave
     
  2. RobF

    RobF Administrator Staff Member

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    Personally, I don't have a problem with slings. They're commonly found on guns... I think they're within the rules.

    However, I'm not sure they help with shooting, except perhaps in the kneeling position. I think most tend to rely on them in the standing position and i'm not sure it actually does any favours... in fact i find my standing is better free than even if i'm leaning on something !

    I think most people i've seen use a sling have dropped them after a time... but then we all need a crook now and then :D
     
  3. holly

    holly Well-Known Member

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    Slings .

    On the subject of slings . i have used one on the side of my bullpups from day one . it is usefull for those of us who have short legs . because the rifle has to be raised . which of course means it is taller. this leads to an instability when taking the shot .this can be helped by wrapping the sling around the arm . there is an obvious difference between this sort of thing and strap's that encircle the body . and let us not forget the shooters who use a sling on standers . so before people go off half cocked . let us consider those who are less well off physically ??? HOLLY
     
  4. JasonGoldsmith66

    JasonGoldsmith66 Banned

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    ...looks like this works...

    Ok, perhaps top FT shooters dont rely on them.. would have thought you would have better stability and control.... since a fixed point allows you to concentrate on 1 less variable..and so you can focus on your breathing technique, scope/target, etc...

    We all used the sling for .22 rimfire rifles at school comps, as well as the .303 Enfield at CCF comps held at Bisley in the prone position...so why the low to none existent uptake on FT comps ? Without a sling in prone...your gun wobbles...if you have a heavy stock to compensate, It applies more pressure on the wrist...Ok, so a glove is used..but still...eliminate a variable, and you get better scores..
     

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  5. neilL

    neilL New Member

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    That is the big difference. Prone .22 RF or even full bore competition is a fixed distance, target elevation, etc so having the sling is a near constant triangulation of forces (shoulder, elbow, hand). You lay down, get in to position and see where the gun is pointing and then wriggle about until it is on target (no aiming), load and gently hold the trigger section and squeeze (wriggle, adjust, etc). Trying that on an FT course is so far from reproducible that you have to leave slack and aim with the scope but a sling in prone is great for zeroing, practicing and judging wind (except you can't "feel" the wind that low down) but very few FT courses have lanes/targets that can be seen prone (even though they are supposed to be visible from any free position).

    Slings are great to begin with (and prone is very different to sitting if you have back problems) but when you get more experience and start competing against the clock (1min showdowns for 2 targets!) then a sling is a major disadvantage! :)

    Cheers
    Neil
     
  6. JasonGoldsmith66

    JasonGoldsmith66 Banned

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    Excellent explanation...

    Cheers for that !

    I also realise, I suppose, under the clock, and the once the hand/arm is 'locked in place' with the sling, its a bit of a technique reaching over the scope to ajust the big wheel for parallax...

    Mmm...I really get to an Ft comp soon ! :D
     
  7. neilL

    neilL New Member

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    Even worse with a front focus obj - that was a very uncomfortable stretch .. and then you have to read the scale hahaha.

    Cheers
    Neil
     
  8. Delphinus

    Delphinus New Member

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    The main reason that I start to use the sling was because I wanted to learn how to use one and now I will keep it.

    It helps in range find and in kneeling and prone it s more stable and here the technical targets have the same size of sitting 15, 25, 32 and 40mm.

    Neil is also right it takes more time.
     
  9. dave croucher

    dave croucher FT, the sport where simple becomes complicated

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    Bfta rules as of June 2011 state that "a single sling, separate or otherwise may be used to steady the aim",does not refer to a single point sling. This to me means that single point and two point slings are ok ,all within the rules. As I read it you can have one of each or more on the gun if you wish so long as you only use one to take the shot
     

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