tolerance for pellet weight

Discussion in 'Hunter (HFT) & Field Target (FT)' started by peterh, Sep 3, 2013.

  1. peterh

    peterh Stoopit forriner.

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    Yo, yet another question from the Pit of Fathomless Ignorance.

    If you, oh Gods of the Ragged One-Hole Groups At 55 Yards, would weigh pellets, for instance the 8.44 grain Exacts, what tolerance would you deem acceptable?

    Bewilderedly yours,
    Peter the Stoopit Forrinner.
     
  2. Neil

    Neil MFTA Winter League Champion 2011 and winner of som

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    Saying 8.44 grains on the lid would make all the contents therein acceptable for me.
     
  3. ellis d

    ellis d Active Member

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    Get a good batch and you wont need to weigh pellets.......leaves more time for beer drinking:D
     
  4. peterh

    peterh Stoopit forriner.

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    Agreed.

    However, how to determine what constitutes a 'good batch'? That would include some weighing.

    Also, purely out of curiosity, I'd like to determine if you can actually see the difference at 55 yards. It would be nice to have a starting figure to go on.
     
  5. HotShot

    HotShot Active Member

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    A good batch will group well at 55 yards. Find the one that groups the best and buy lots.

    I tried 8 batches - narrowed it down to 3 after 10 shots of each. 20 more shots of these 3 and I had my batch. Then I bought 100 tins.

    Dave.
     
  6. peterh

    peterh Stoopit forriner.

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    Hey! I may be ignorant, but I had this much figured out! ;)

    However. Yes, there is always a however with me... I do not always have access to a range where I can shoot under windless circumstances AND with sufficient light (read: no, I do not often have access to an indoor 50m range). It would be nice to be able to not even try a batch if there is a large weight variation.

    If I would only know what you guys consider a weight variation that is acceptable.
     
  7. Brian.Samson

    Brian.Samson Allowed in Sales Staff Member

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    Buy a downrange chrono.. stick one at 50m and choose the batch that has the highest velocity and smallest spread.
    Not only will that pellet be the most likely to group the best, it will also take less wind than other batches.

    Very little to be gained by weighing pellets, but you can prove this to yourself by testing some weighed pellets using the same method
     
  8. NJR 100

    NJR 100 Because I`m AWESIME !!

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    I must try this chrono test of yours Brian Thursday, weather permitting with my chosen batch.

    Having weighed pellets from other good batches, 8.2 - 8.8, chuck them all in the pouch and at 50m you wont see a difference, if your Average fps is 15 fps or less.
     
  9. HotShot

    HotShot Active Member

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    I don't have access to a windless range either. Most FT courses have wind - so that is how I test. I am not worried about a horizontal spread. I am looking for high / low shots in the groups. Those are a no-no and will make me drop that batch from the selection. If the group opens up horizontally then I should be switched on enough to see the change in wind strength as I pull the trigger and understand that the group has opened up due to the wind.

    Dave.
     
  10. Brian.Samson

    Brian.Samson Allowed in Sales Staff Member

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    I'd be interested in the results Si, take a bad batch of pellets with you too for comparison. ( Not so bad that you hit the chrono though :D )
     
  11. Neil

    Neil MFTA Winter League Champion 2011 and winner of som

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    Only been shooting FT for nearly 15 years now and never weighed a pellet yet.

    Maybe I'll start doing it if I ever start taking it seriously, or get a well lit 50m indoor range.
     
  12. Neil-T

    Neil-T Boingers forever.

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    Nice one my bearded friend. Lol
     
  13. Neil-T

    Neil-T Boingers forever.

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    To answer your question a bit more in depth.

    I used to weigh pellets a few years ago, lets say a tin of JSB 8.44grain.
    Anything between 8.38 and 8.50 I would use only for competition use, anything outside these weights I would just plink with.

    I then did an indoor benchrest test with the heaviest and lightest of the batch. 8.27 being the lightest and 8.62 being the heaviest. The difference in POI was negligible, that's why I don't weigh them anymore.

    By all means do it if it gives you confidence, but personally your time would be better spent drinking beer. Neil.
     
  14. peterh

    peterh Stoopit forriner.

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    Funny you should say that.

    Out of curiosity, I weighed an entire tin of JSB's yesterday... only to find that all 501(!) pellets were within a range of 8.38 and 8.52 grain. Which in itself is reassuring enough, and which indicates why, in order to get better results, there is no need to weigh pellets from a good batch whatsoever.

    But I would not do this because I want to shoot better. Trust me, not practicing shooting for ten years does wonders for your inability to shoot properly... so in my case, the time would be better spent practicing rather than drinking beer. Or weighing pellets. It's just that it's very hard to practice when it is pitch-dark. ;)

    Then why the bleep would I do it at all?
    Because I am insatiably curious for information for which there is no apparent use. I am a guy who would use (and actually has used) his lab scale to determine the average weight of a housefly. :eek:
    Turns out this was a fairly useless excercise, because it turns out that the average adult housefly weighs APPROXIMATELY three times the error margin of my lab scale: the margin of error is specified at 0.004 grams, and if I remember correctly, the average number I came up with from a batch of 17 dead houseflies is 0.014 grams.

    Of course, the tin of Exacts wasn't the only tin I went through. I also took a random pick of 25 pellets from a tin of H&N FTTs, and the result was rather shocking, as the extremes were more than a grain apart... 8.18 to 9.23.
    Whether this is the cause, let alone the single cause, of why I can't hit the broad side of a barn with these pellets remains unanswered, but it did make me curious. Hence the question.

    The simple answer would've been 'dump them and take the loss', which is what I do anyway... ok, they're in the stack of pellets to use for practicing standers at closer distances.
    But I was one of kids who always wanted to know why, and spent many a night not watching the telly, but trying to figure stuff out (and blowing a few fuses in the process). And that kid is still in there. :D

    So there ;)

    IF I would ever decide to weigh pellets for a comp, I would only do so to silence the voices in my head, because I have now empirically proven that there is no physiological reason for weighing your pellets. ;)
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2013
  15. Ratinator

    Ratinator Well-Known Member

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    Because I am insatiably curious for information for which there is no apparent use. I am a guy who would use (and actually has used) his lab scale to determine the average weight of a housefly. :eek:
    Turns out this was a fairly useless excercise, because it turns out that the average adult housefly weighs APPROXIMATELY three times the error margin of my lab scale: the margin of error is specified at 0.004 grams, and if I remember correctly, the average number I came up with from a batch of 17 dead houseflies is 0.014 grams.


    Was the fly dead?
    Had he just eaten,had he just extracted a finer roasted coffee bean.
    If he was dead did you check he still had all his leg's and wing's.
    Just thinking outloud

    Now go shooting and don't worry about the pellet's:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o:eek:o
     
  16. peterh

    peterh Stoopit forriner.

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    Haha, you'll have a laugh over the fact that I actually considered some of these questions. Yes, the flies were dead... they had died less than an hour before the experiment because of a prior fly spray attack.
    And yes, I excluded a few flies from the experiment because I wasn't sure if they still had all their bits attached.

    :)
     

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