The definitive LG100/LG110 tuning thread

Discussion in 'Steyr' started by Agent XXX, Apr 26, 2013.

  1. Agent XXX

    Agent XXX Non member

    Hi Guys,

    So this is my attempt to start the definitive LG100/LG110 tuning thread.

    I'll make a start, and I'd like you guys to weigh-in with any corrections and suggestions. Hopefully we should all end up with a valuable resource?

    Please bear in mind:
    1. It is your responsibility, and solely your responsibility, to ensure that you stay within the law.
    2. You carry out any mods at your own risk – that's the way the Big Ball bounces.
    3. I don't know EVERYTHING. In fact, the more I learn, the more I realise how little I actually know!

    Before we get started, I'd like to thank the various people who have helped me over the years. All of your help is greatly appreciated. In particular I'd like to thank Richard Woods (The Dictator) and Chris Cundey – two gentlemen who have been extremely generous with their time and advice.

    And as with everything in life: if it ain't broken... don't fix it!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 26, 2013
  2. Agent XXX

    Agent XXX Non member

    OK, so let's get started.

    We're going to assume that you've completely stripped your rifle down into its basic component parts. If you haven't done this already, you might find Steyr's own videos on YouTube handy.
     
  3. Agent XXX

    Agent XXX Non member

    The first thing you're going to want to do, is to check for signs of wear and damage.

    DAMAGE - VELOCITY SCREWS
    One of the most common types of damage that you'll see occurs on HP and Hunter stocked rifles. This problem occurs with both the HP style internal (hidden) and FT style external (visible) velocity screws.

    The original standard black HP and Hunter have a tendency to 'wiggle' and it's tempting to try and alleviate this wiggle by tightening the stock bolt up as tight as you can possibly get it. More often than not this doesn't actually cure the problem – instead the net result is that the stock bolt actually goes further into the trigger block than it should and it chews up the threads on the velocity adjuster.

    You can actually crush the external style velocity adjusters quite easily. But even if you only eat into the threads on the adjuster screw, you run the risk of reaming out the corresponding softer threads on the inside of the trigger block – which is a VERY, VERY, expensive part to have to replace.

    As soon as you spot any signs of damage to the velocity adjuster, do yourself a favour and replace it forthwith.

    I'll cover a preferable method of solving the wiggle issue, at a later point.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 26, 2013
  4. Agent XXX

    Agent XXX Non member

    DAMAGE - DRY FIRING MECHANISM
    Another common type of damage that you'll see is caused by the trigger dry firing mechanism.

    The dry firing mechanism is actually just a pivoting arm which blocks the hammers path. This arm is moved out of the path of the hammer when the cocking arm is completely closed.

    When you cock the rifle and fire it using the dry firing mechanism, the hammer travels forward under the force of the hammer spring before being abruptly stopped by the dry firing mechanism.

    From anecdotal evidence, the dry firing mechanism appears to have been designed with the 8J (6ftlb) rifle in mind, and its respective weaker hammer spring pressure.

    On 16J (12ftlb) and FAC rated rifles, the hammer smacks in the dry fire mechanism with such a force that the you will eventually start to see damage to the hammer itself. Again, like a deformed velocity screw, a deformed hammer has the potential to start eating into the softer trigger block.

    I hammer with only minor damage can be respun on a lathe (they can be expensive to replace outright).

    If you're using a 16J (12ftlb) rifle you'll probably want to keep your use of the dry firing mechanism to a minimum.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 29, 2013
  5. Agent XXX

    Agent XXX Non member

    ELIMINATING INCONSISTENCIES – POLISHING THE SPRINGS
    OK, so as a spring compresses, three things happen:

    1. The spring gets shorter
    2. The springs diameter increases slightly
    3. The ends twist in relation to each other

    None of that will come as a surprise to anyone who has tuned a springer rifle, but #3 is of particular interest here.

    If you strip a Steyr which has been shot a lot, you will quite often find damage to the various faces that the springs are rotating against:

    1. The inside face of an internal type velocity adjuster screw
    2. The inside face of the exhaust valve (both new and old types)
    3. The inside face of the exhaust valve chamber cap

    This damage is caused by the unfinished ends of the springs twisting repeatedly against these components. The damage itself usually takes the form of a series of pits arranged in a circular fashion.

    In an ideal scenario, you would want each end of the spring to be able to coil and uncoil in a predictable and consistent fashion – and this means minimising friction and inconsistencies.

    With this in mind, I make a point of polishing the three major springs in the rifle.

    1. The hammer spring
    2. The exhaust valve spring
    3. The Stabilizer spring

    I've found the easiest way to do this is with a drill and a few sheets of different grades of wet & dry sandpaper.

    Start by gripping the spring in the chuck of the drill. You need to be careful that the rotation of the drill is such that the sharp end of the spring isn't 'eating into' the sandpaper (and potentially your fingers).

    Whilst the drill is spinning, press the exposed end of the spring on the coarsest sheet of wet and dry that you have. Once the end of the spring is bright and even, repeat the process with a slightly finer grade of wet and dry. Keeping repeating the process, going finer and finer each time. I usually finish with a 12,000 grit paper. You should end up with a perfectly flat faced polished spring.

    Now repeat with the other end.

    Whilst I am doing this, I usually polish up the external face of the spring as well. Whilst there is no real benefit to doing this from a performance standpoint, it does help you to identify where there is a build up of crap on the spring at a later date.
     
  6. Agent XXX

    Agent XXX Non member

    ELIMINATING INCONSISTENCIES - UNSHEATHING THE HAMMER TAIL (HP STYLE)
    When the LG100 was originally designed, the hammer spring and the hammer itself were able to touch during the firing cycle. A characteristic of this design was the loud 'ping' which was caused by the harmonics of the spring touching the hammer tail (a bit like a tuning fork).

    At some point, presumably in an effort to address customer feedback and overcome sales objections, Steyr took the decision to sheath the hammer tail, so that the hammer spring and the hammer itself were no longer able to touch each other directly.

    Whilst a sheathed hammer tail does indeed kill the 'ping', it also causes shot-to-shot inconsistencies. You only have to look at a hammer sheath that has seen a lot of action to see first hand how the end of the springs eat into the sheath.

    Again, like the pitting left by the unfinished spring ends, the historical data (the damage left) speaks for itself.

    If you're going to be using your rifle to shoot targets, then shot-to-shot consistency will be front of your mind and there's a good argument that Steyr got the design right the first time around.

    The hammer sheath can simply be cut off with a scalpel or stanley knife. I usually then grip the hammer in my drill and spin it through a piece of 12,000 grit sandpaper to polish it up perfectly.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 30, 2013
  7. holly

    holly Well-Known Member

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    Good

    Good stuff cameron . have you ever done a back to back test with a LG 100 / LG110 barrel to find out which is actullay the best . you hear a lot of shooters going on about , get a LG100 barrel . but are they really better . cheers HOLLY:)
     
  8. burjaka

    burjaka Member

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    Polish the spring ends was the best thing I did to mine.
    ;)
    Thanks for this post.
     
  9. SDplinker

    SDplinker Pellet testing...yawn

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    Thanks for taking the time

    I know the knowledge can be hard won so I appreciate the effort. When and if I own a Steyr I will be sure to bookmark this thread.

    On the LG100's - how useful are the Steyr videos or are those only for the 110 model?

    -Casey
     
  10. fudge-1200

    fudge-1200 New Member

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    Pretty useful, I stripped my 100 down watching those and it was more or less the same, the one differance is my 100 has the removable butt (Target Rifle) all you do is take the bolt out.
     
  11. Delphinus

    Delphinus New Member

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    Any one of you replace the cocking lever by one that don't rust?

    The bluing of mine partially came off and with rain it oxidized, after lube it s OK but I have to disassemble the rifle to lube the part.

    What do you guys do? Too much lube can go to a wrong place like the hammer.
     
  12. fudge-1200

    fudge-1200 New Member

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    Mine is 11 years old and the bluing has come off but there is no trace of rust anywhere, I was amazed at how new it all looked in there when I stripped it down.
     
  13. Delphinus

    Delphinus New Member

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    Mine it's also looking good but was under heavy rain and next day had some rust, clean it and now it s OK but I don t know how it is inside, probably it s OK and only the contact point with the action gets oxide after lost the bluing.
     
  14. fudge-1200

    fudge-1200 New Member

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    Just make sure it doesn't rust on the pivot pin:eek:
     
  15. Delphinus

    Delphinus New Member

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    Picking up the post of Agent XXX, this is what happen to mine and how I fixed it.

    DAMAGE – COCKING LEVER

    If your lever open or don’t close and you have the correct pressure of the barrel and noticed that the sharp point worn out with a dremmel cut the red area making sure that is the same size of the cocking roller.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2013
  16. fudge-1200

    fudge-1200 New Member

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    Does that hole get bigger with wear?
     
  17. fudge-1200

    fudge-1200 New Member

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    I did notice with my LG-100 when I put it back it seemed stiff, so I stripped it down again and found that loosening the 2 bolts very slightly made a big differance, you can test it without putting it back together...
    Gary.
     
  18. Delphinus

    Delphinus New Member

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    No the hole stays de same mine wear where the arrow is pointing and didn't lock so I open the read area and now it's OK.

    Yes the screw of the cocking roller to tight or to loose don't let it work properly.
     
  19. CameronWilson

    CameronWilson Member

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    The most accurate Steyr that I have owned and shot had a Barley Twist barrel.

    However, I believe that identifying the perfect pellet for your barrel, and eliminating POI shifts, has a far greater effect on the accuracy of your Steyr than how your particular barrel was manufactured.

    For me, owning an LG100 with a Barley Twist barrel was more about owning a little piece of Steyr Mannlicher history.
     
  20. fudge-1200

    fudge-1200 New Member

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    Pellets

    Hi Cam.What pellets did you use in yours, at the moment I am getting one or two pellets going where I am aiming and then the next three flying high left or right, I am meeting up with Harry P next week he will be in Cardiff hopefully he can sort out the issues I am having with it.
    Gary.
     

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