Targets in the glare of the sun.

Discussion in 'Hunter (HFT) & Field Target (FT)' started by johnboy1, Mar 14, 2013.

  1. johnboy1

    johnboy1 New Member

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    In an HFT competition, if a target in a tree is directly in the line of the sun's glare and to aim at the target through the scope would mean staring at the sun. what action can be taken under the rules.

    Regards,
    Johnboy1
     
  2. Conor

    Conor Never been banned from sales Staff Member

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    Wear sunglasses? :cool:
     
  3. tonto.boy

    tonto.boy Member

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    Good point conor.
     
  4. Charlts

    Charlts Getting dusty

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    Get a partner to shade you scope with a score card, use a sun shade, wear a cap loads of things.:)
     
  5. tugg

    tugg itchy trigger finger

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    and just hope everyone else has the same trouble when they take their shot.
     
  6. rich

    rich Active Member

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    Don't know about under the rules but I would refuse to take the shot. My eyesight is worth more than a doughnut on a piece of paper.

    I might let my feelings be known to the course designer, politely, later, in the time honoured fashion. :eek:o
     
  7. Bellerophon

    Bellerophon Active Member

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    With all due respect sometimes it's hard to predict that the sun is going be directly behind a target, just saying.
     
  8. johnharper

    johnharper Member

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    as above as you can't predict what mother nature has in store for us
    john
     
  9. trev

    trev New Member

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    If the targets were to the north of the shooter you could comfortably predict you would have no chance of the sun causing problems. Sun always shines from the south around here anyway. :)
     
  10. maestro

    maestro European Champion 2018

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    This is not really true: we can know exactly where the sun is on any particular date an hour :)

    It is an other question that we can not expect from course builders to check every target's altitude and azimuth to see whether the sun is too close behind the target or not...
     
  11. trev

    trev New Member

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    Theres an app for that! Called 'the photographers ephemeris'. It will take your location (or you can stipulate a location), it will know the time or date if you want it then, or at any time past or future. From that it will calculate where the sun (and moon I believe) will be.

    Not in every course builders toolkit perhaps..... But am sure common sense would prevail, wouldn't it??????
     
  12. Brian.Samson

    Brian.Samson Allowed in Sales Staff Member

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    We had this in a winter league FT shoot at Emley Moor in December - Sun straight up the scope!.. I just moved my position a little so it wasn't directly down the scope and luckily there was a tree that could hide some of the glare.

    Not easy to see the target at all, but with a small shift in position I was able to at least see (sort of) the target without the sun burning a hole in my retina.

    That's what I'd suggest for HFT - come off peg
     
  13. rich

    rich Active Member

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    It's mainly going to be a winter problem; in the summer the sun is too high in the sky unless either it's a silly height target or the shoot is going on pretty late, say after 6pm. :mad:

    I think I know my piece of land well enough to avoid the risk.
     
  14. NJR 100

    NJR 100 Because I`m AWESIME !!

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    The sun's rays get "blown" past Shebbear so it dont matter lol

    we had it at Tondu last year, lots of people had white out, though Leup users did not:eek:

    Thats why for this years winter round i made sure none of the south - westerly targets were elevated shots, pointing up towards the sky.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2013
  15. skires

    skires Well-Known Member

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    I'm sure that this will go down like a bag of sh!te ...

    Not the sun shining directly in your eyes behind the target but ...

    In cricket we obviously have sight screens that sit just outside the boundary so that the batsmen can see the ball coming out of the bowler's hand. It's usually traditional for these to be white. At a club where I played we had large white panels for sight screens. Fantastic on a dull day. However, one year, they painted the screens in white gloss. On a sunny day it was unbearable when you were batting with the sun behind you. The sun glared off the white sight screens and they literally blinded you. Following this the screens were painted with a matt very pale blue paint. A lot of clubs do this ( just a hint of blue ). This gives a perfect solution. The red ball can still be seen against the pale blue ... and on very sunny days the pale blue ( matt ) doesn't give the same glare as white.

    So why am I talking about cricket again? ... because the rule ( or the norm ) in HFT seems to be to use white painted targets with a black kill. I've had loads of targets where, on a sunny Sunday morning, the sun has been behind me and looking through the scope the target plate is very bright and glaring and having taken the shot I've still got the after burn of the image in my eye for a few minutes.

    I've put shoots on in the past and used pale blue matt painted targets and I think they are a better option than white. You can still see the black kill zone but you don't get the glare that a white target gives ( especially if gloss paint used ) with the sun behind the shooter.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2013
  16. Mog

    Mog New Member

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    As above, most course setters will know where not to position targets.
     
  17. johnharper

    johnharper Member

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    what you also must remember is that thiis BLIGHTY good old england the home of rain snow and lots of low sunlight this time of the year, and alot of course builders don't carry gadgets and charts around to set a course up also many course builders don't do it on purpose to set a target so that a competitor is blinded
    just my pennys worth
    john
     
  18. Lavant_Lad

    Lavant_Lad Old Git.

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    Avoiding white out or dazzle.

    Some clubs a very restricted by the land they have available, so setting out a competition range is quite a challenge.:eek:o
     
  19. Tench

    Tench WHFTA World Champion 2016.

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    I remember a target at MAD one year in a national getting pulled because it was up against a bright sky, it may not have had the sun directly behind it but it still just apeared as a dark silhouette with the kill hard to identify for some people and scopes. So no i dont believe anyone would expect you to shoot it or even could shoot it if the sun where directly behind it.
     
  20. blackscale

    blackscale Member

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    always wondered what them big cricket screens were for...thought they were to protect things from particular shots or something...:rolleyes::D
    A target causing a serious problem against bright light will get pulled.
    :D
     

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