Practice makes perfect?

Discussion in 'General Airgun Chat' started by Gibbs, Aug 2, 2010.

  1. Gibbs

    Gibbs New Member

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    Having just had my best result ever in FT after my longest break without any practice, I wonder why too much practice can ruin your shooting?
    Surely, practice makes perfect? doesn't it?
     
  2. NJR 100

    NJR 100 Because I`m AWESIME !!

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    Are you talking about gp 7?
     
  3. Gibbs

    Gibbs New Member

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    Yes, I run a little gardening business and it's manic at the moment! I had started to forget what my gun looked like!
     
  4. NJR 100

    NJR 100 Because I`m AWESIME !!

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    Personally I would not read too much into it, Gp 7.
    It (too me) was about as easy as Gp 1. I only came out of kill about 5 times. Not the hardest shoot and I dont think I worked very hard for a 44.
    Are you doing Sywell?

    My shooting usually suffers if I have more than 3 weeks wiithout firing the gun
     
  5. Gibbs

    Gibbs New Member

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    Yes, I will be at Sywell.
    My GP7 score wasn't really my point. After talking to a few people, they said they had heard many times before from various people that too much practice isn't the best thing. And some people claim not to practice at all, choosing to only shoot in the comps.
    So does anyone have a theory as to why too much practice is detrimental?
     
  6. Artfull-Bodger

    Artfull-Bodger Member

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    I suppose if your discipline is good and you stick religiously to your method then it shouldn't be detrimental, however bad habits can creep in if your complacent!
     
  7. Gibbs

    Gibbs New Member

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    So, poor quality practice could be drumming in bad habits?
    Perhaps far too much practice makes some people lose concentration and not really think about what their doing.? (And just go through the motions - but the wrong motions)
     
  8. D Martin

    D Martin Non member

    Not always the case mate, I usually take a break from competitions during the winter and ease off the practising to get a rest but this year I shot the Midlands hunter right through and though I got a good result there I have shot terrible in the UKAs from the beginning of this year and just crashed and burned at the worlds.Infact I've had some of my worst results for four years this year.
    I shoot every week without fail yet my son, who I can usually just beat on a good day normally wins me if he can't be bothered to practise, it's strange he always does better with a few weeks lay off in between competitions.
    I think you need to practise enough to keep your eye in but not too much that you burn yourself out. My problem I think was that I'd done so much shooting I'd started to loose a bit of interest without reolizing and the worse I got the more down hearted I became about it so the worse I got and so on.
    Had a short break now though looking after the missis following her operation and getting back into it with a new bit of kit so I feel much more enthusiastic about the rest of the season and I'm really looking forward to it.
    Yes I think practise makes perfect but a rest now and then is as important as anything. Kieran Turner once said that good shooting was 60% attitude,30% skill and 10% luck, don't know if it's true but there you go.

    Dave
     
  9. RobF

    RobF Administrator Staff Member

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    I'm really struggling to fire a shot out of comps... last time was erm... think the week before Nefta Classic.

    The problem with practice, is practising a bad habit, or becoming comfortable with non competiton conditions and then tripping up under them... that's not to say it's not beneficial... it certainly helps, but when that brick wall or performance plateau appears, it's normally not a lack of practice that's apparent... in fact, it seems the worse the brick wall/plateau is, the more the person practices.

    It's just far more productive to train as opposed to practice, and the subtle difference between training and practice is probably best explained in the same manner as the difference between instruction and coaching.

    Identifying the problem areas a good step to working productively...

    Also, knowing you're on the back foot a bit, often makes you concentrate just a tad more than being relaxed and becoming sloppy... but it's important to concentrate on the stuff you can control, rather than fretting about the stuff you have less control over.
     
  10. Willbe

    Willbe I Like BIG Hats!

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    Qusetion is how do you KNOW if you are doing the wrong thing or not, if it seems to work just keeping with it.
     
  11. RobF

    RobF Administrator Staff Member

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    that is a good question... ;)

    and that's why grabbing a club coach is a good start... or even better, getting qualified yourself :D

    to be honest, it's a long old march to get the principles in a post... but one main aspect is honest objectivity... but having a chat with a coach may help open up the principles a bit more to help you make your own decisions on what to work on and how.
     
  12. Willbe

    Willbe I Like BIG Hats!

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    Got an open mind and open to any ideas/comments. Just access to a coach i'm having trouble with?
     
  13. RobF

    RobF Administrator Staff Member

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    I'm trying to sort that, but it's a bit of a long game :) (getting there though...)

    Maybe best to start a thread on what you're having trouble with and then we can work into that a bit on here... not ideal, but then perhaps you can take the ideas to someone for an eye over...
     
  14. Willbe

    Willbe I Like BIG Hats!

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    Like it, watch this space...
     
  15. Conor

    Conor Never been banned from sales Staff Member

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    Practice makes perfect, only if you know what perfect is and how to get there! :);)

    Personally I don't practice, I train. :shot:
     
  16. LittleJack

    LittleJack Active Member

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    practice makes perfect????

    Through the summer months i go shooting at least 3 times a week this is about it for me, i think your discipline shots are most important and 99% of people need to practice them, and get comfortable with the way that they are shooting. Too much practice and i start pulling shots and twitching rather then losing concentration(plus my pellet allowance off the old man goes way down:D:eek:). Everybody is different you have just gotta find whats right for you.:shot:
     
  17. Gibbs

    Gibbs New Member

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    When it comes to knowing what perfect is, or getting a coach, Rich Clark from Shebbear (SWEFTA)organised an excellent two day course last year which I attended and enjoyed a great deal.
    It wasn't expensive with the cost spread over the number attending and the Olympic coach (who's name I'm afraid I have forgotten:eek:) was excellent. I would highly recommend such a course to anyone.
     
  18. Gibbs

    Gibbs New Member

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    I agree with this and I started to shoot around my club course standing only, it did teach me a few things and help my muscles to get used to standing like a teapot! But it also started to mess up my normal FT routine and I started to lose my trigger control a little too (As I tend to snatch the trigger a little on the standers) So now my version of training/practice is to find as many comps as possible and shoot them.
     
  19. rich

    rich Active Member

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    Thanks for the kind words Alec.:)

    The tutor was Bob Dickie who is - or was at the time - the head honcho for England's disabled Olympian shooting team. We would have had Dave Froggett but he was out of action due to injury.

    Last year the cost of the course per student was under £60 for the two days, and that included all the course material, notes, manuals etc, use of our club facilities for two days and the hire of the nearby classroom, lunch for both days and tea and coffee etc. The students had to add their own travel costs and accommodation; the pub did B&B for £35 a night and the local landladies were a bit less, or you could pitch tent at our club ground or lay out a bedroll in the marquee for nothing.

    This course is actually the first step in a series of NSRA series of training courses. As it's a proper recognised course for which you get a certificate of competence it does have to be regulated and there is a requirement that the participant has either a NSRA number or a BFTA number so they can be tracked. NSRA membership is about £70 a year and it brings lots of other benefits; a BFTA card is £4 at the moment.

    If there's enough interest I'm happy to lay on another course, 2009 was the third one I've done so far. It needs 12 guaranteed participants.
     
  20. RobF

    RobF Administrator Staff Member

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    Hopefully soon i should be able to help out with that as well Rich.
     

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