Pellet testing with the Paul Short titanium piston 97

Discussion in 'Piston & Spring' started by Neil180, Dec 19, 2017.

  1. Neil180

    Neil180 Member

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    After reading a number of articles on forums I thought that I would spend an hour or so today testing different pellets out in my much loved HW97 that has been worked on by Paul Short to include his titanium piston, inset rear guide, australian red seal etc etc. It is a great gun - minimal recoil and ridiculously accurate.

    I have my zero target set out at 63 yards and it is my favourite target to shoot at. You have to be bang on to hit it consistently and of course the pellets have to suit the gun and group well or you will sit there all day just throwing lead up the garden and not hitting anything.

    I tested 4 different types of pellet in the gun. I shot 50 of each (more in the case of the winning pellet) in order to get a realistic feel and understanding of the performace of the pellet. I was shooting rested on a shooting bag from the seated position.

    AA Diabolo Express 7.87 grains 4.52

    These pellets needed one and a half mil dots of hold over to get on target. There was little if any wind but it was very difficult to hit the central spinning target. The top spinner was a non starter. These pellets did not suit the gun at all and I could not get any consistent performance from them

    JSB Exact 8.44 grain 4.52

    These pellets needed one and a half mil dots of holdover to get on target. These were unbelievably consistent. I had a run of 25 shots where I hit the central target every time. I hit the top spinner 3 times in a row! Amazing performance and they obviously suited my gun very well.

    H&N FTT 8.64 Grain

    These have been my pellet of choice for years - a known quantity for me. They required 2 mil dots of holdover to get on target and I was regularly hitting the central spnner. Good pellets and have always performed well for me.

    RWS Superdome 8.3 grain

    These pellets actually required just over 2 mil dots of holdover to get on target. They were fairly accurate but not as consistently hitting the target as the previous 2 pellets.


    So there is a new king in town for my PS 97. It appears to love the JSB Exacts - that one and a half mil dot holdover and bang on groupiing and accuracy it a clear winner - which is actually quite a surprise for me as I have always used the H&N FTTs with no complaints previously. Just goes to show - its alwasy worth a bit of an experiment evry now and then.

    I will be putting and order for a sleeve of JSB Exacts after the christmas rush is over :D
     
  2. Alanok2002

    Alanok2002 Member

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    Make sure you order the same die / batch number and not buy 4.51-4.52 ect as different die numbers in say 4.52 will shoot different
     
  3. Neil180

    Neil180 Member

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    SOunds like I need to buy more tins of the same pellets so I can suss out if they shoot similarly.....
     
  4. Neil180

    Neil180 Member

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    And where do you find die information?
     
  5. john0neuk

    john0neuk Well-Known Member

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    Neil
    All the info is on the label on the base of the tin.

    It covers die, batch and date of manufacture mostly from memory. I can never remember the full code for JSB's but somebody will know. I go on the first 2 numbers of the long number and the 2 digit number that is the slightly larger font, below and to the left to match up for me, but as I said that could be the wrong ones in reality.

    As stated above the actual 4.51, 4.52 and 8.44 gms etc etc is basically meaningless as when measured and indeed weighed most pellet tins have a big variation per tin. Measuring and weighing pellets is where "madness lies" IMHO to be honest - been there and done that!

    Having a consistent weight for a chrono session is no bad thing that said!
     
  6. Neil180

    Neil180 Member

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    never been that technical to worry about die numbers etc. The FTTs have always done the job for me without a problem. I could happily still shoot them with the same results as I always have had I suspect but having had a good experience with these JSBs I will get a few tins in and see how they go. Sod die numbers though. If they are that finicky that you have to have a specific die number before you get the same pellet again I will just stick with what I know in future :D
     
  7. Cooper_dan

    Cooper_dan Well-Known Member

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    With JSB the first couple of numbers are the die. If the long number is 7 digits, then just the first 1 is the die i.e 5769486 would be die 5. If it's 8 digits then the first 2 numbers are the die.

    Different die's do perform differently. For example I have a die of JSB that shoot 0.5 ft-lb higher than any others. But other dies that are more accurate at long range.
    Every pellet manufacturer has multiple dies for each pellet, some just don't give you that information
     
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  8. Amac

    Amac Active Member

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    Glad that you at least found a pellet capable of performing as well if not better than the FTT Neil. I suppose it could rightly be said that using a particular die/batch number is good practice if you have the time and could be arsed to track the right pellet down. I know people who have spent over a grand on purchasing a whole batch of JSB pellets from the manufacturers directly when they have found what they consider to be a good pellet.
    If you live in the real world as I do, I would just find a local retailer who has a few different batches in stock, buy a tin of each and then decide which performs best. Once you have located the batch, buy four or five tins more then. That is if you could be bothered though! The problem is that it really does make a big deal of difference if you find the pellet your gun/s prefer. Good luck!
    Andy
     
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  9. Neil180

    Neil180 Member

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    That sounds a bit more like me to be fair. I might just trot around the local gunshops when I get time and have a read on the back of a couple of tins of pellets.... lol
     
  10. Alanok2002

    Alanok2002 Member

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    I found the die my gun liked then i buy in sleeves of 10 tins at a time neil if you look on intershoot they list the die number
     
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