How Steyr Regulator Bleed Air

Discussion in 'Steyr' started by Jay Shi, Mar 18, 2019.

  1. Jay Shi

    Jay Shi New Member

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    Hello all, here is a question. I have a Steyr LP10 air pistol which use the almost the same regulator as the rifle with less pressure. I understand how it regulates the pressure, for pistol it's about 70 bar. What I don't understand is how it bleed off the air when the cylinder is taken off.

    Once you screw on the air cylinder the piston makes contact with the valve and seal off the high pressure from the cylinder. Since the entrance is sealed no air at this point can come in or leave. So how does the air get bleed of when the cylinder is uncrewed, I can hear all the air in the chamber coming out?

    When the cylinder is unscrewed the high pressure is reduced to atmospheric, I thought with 70 bar of pressure pushing on the valve no air should bleed off?

    Thanks
     
  2. RobF

    RobF Administrator Staff Member

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    Because it doesn't seal that well. As soon as air can pass that seal it drops the pressure in the reg and allows the bellvilles to force it open and it dumps the air. The flipside means that if it doesn't seal that well one way, then it doesn't seal that well the other way, and depending on how bad that is will affect how much creep you have. Depending on how bad the creep is will depend on how much you notice it. I'm figuring for a pistol that's going to be used at 10m, it's not that much of a concern. In fact I'm not sure how much concern there is about it in other applications, but if they can be made to seal it's a good way of ruling that issue out if you're looking to solve an issue.
     
  3. Jay Shi

    Jay Shi New Member

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    Thank you Rob for the explanation, it makes sense that by design the seal is imperfect.
     
  4. RobF

    RobF Administrator Staff Member

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    I'm not sure it's by design, but getting them to seal isn't that easy especially if you consider the size of the seat contact area and what happens to the seat when the reg adjusted. But for a short range pistol it wouldn't bother me.
     
  5. ksts100

    ksts100 Member

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    I wonder if is better when the cylinder has Quick fill ??
    Every time when we remove the air cylinder, is possible the adjustment of the piston to change(move) and make creep ?
    It a question that i have long time..
     
  6. Conor

    Conor Never been banned from sales Staff Member

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    Good question, however the piston moves for every shot.
    Depressurising May have an effect but I don’t think ultimately it leads to negatively altering the piston and it seating and sealing properly.
     
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  7. ksts100

    ksts100 Member

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    At every shoot the piston moves under pressure and seal ,the problem maybe will occur with out the pressure.
    My reg was servicing before 2 years and i checked again before one month ,it was working in the same pressure and with out any creep.
    but in some others Steyr regs we found creep in 3 months( after servicing)
     
  8. Adam

    Adam Well-Known Member

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    Even at longer range you’re not going to notice. Unless you’re benchresting it at very long range with a scope on. Minor variation in trigger technique will move it more than any reg creep. It’s not like a rifle.
     
  9. RobF

    RobF Administrator Staff Member

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    No that won’t change the behaviour. The nozzle is set into position and set. Depressurisation doesn’t change that.

    If you adjust the reg pressure then you increase the chance of creep. To avoid creep you need to do the machining work to remove it then set the reg and not adjust it, leave it alone.

    But as Adam says on a pistol it’s not a concern.
     

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